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AGK
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Posts: 79

INBREEDING

By now you breeders are undoubtedly aware that inbreeding is the breeding of closely related animals. Examples of which are: father to daughter, mother to son, and brother to sister. The purpose of inbreeding is to attempt to capture and preserve desired genes. The favorite argument against inbreeding is, of course, the case of humans, the fear of bringing into the world physically deformed and mentally lacking individuals. Fortunately for us, breeders through the centuries have not been afraid to rule out inbreeding as a means of solidifying genes in our breed of dog. Every breed of dog in existence today has been developed for a specific purpose through inbreeding. In any breeding, one or more trait will invariably be lost “in the shuffle” of genes. But with inbreeding, you may also intensify other traits as well. Certainly, when you undertake to develop a similar set of genes from different dogs, the poor and undesirable qualities can also become dominant. Lack of endurance, weak bones, brittle teeth, zero biting ability, loss of fertility, and a lack of resistance to parasites and diseases is often the results of inbreeding, known as FILIAL DEGENERATION. At what point does filial degeneration appear depends on the species and genealogies. Most American Pit Bull Terriers can tolerate a significant amount of inbreeding without any ill effects. A seemingly perfect bulldog, in appearance, may have some or all these undesirable traits in his genetic make up. Inbreeding this dog could bring these unwanted traits to the surface and suppress the desirable genes the breeder had hoped to preserve. Unfortunately, genes are not visible to the naked eye, therefore the sounder the dogs, the less chance of undesirable specimens turning up.

There is, as with everything, some debate as to which type of inbreeding produces the best progeny. I for one farther to daughter breeding have produced the best match and brood dogs. My reason is, the majority of great match dogs are males and if bred to their daughters, the gene of the sire then becomes intensified, If the same match dogs was bred to his dam, the genes of the resulting litter would center on the mother and not the match dog’s. Many breeders fail to realize that inbreeding to a great producing bitch doesn’t yield offspring that make for great match dogs, but brood stock like the dam.

Chavis' CH. YELLOW JOHN ROM

Bass' TRAMP RED BOY Teal's JEFF Teal's SARGE

Teal's LOU

McLeod’s SUSIE Q GAL Teal's JEFF

Frank's SUGAR

Whaley's RED FEATHER Bass' TRAMP RED BOY Teal's JEFF

McLeod’s SUSIE Q GAL

Bass' CAT Bass' TRAMP RED BOY

Bass' CLEO

As you can see, Chavis’ Ch. Yellow John was inbred on Bass’ Tramp Red Boy, who was inbred on Teal’s Jeff. Yellow John himself wasn’t bred until he was about three years old and had an untimely death. He was bred to about nine bitches, and in those nine litters, only 23 dogs lived to maturity. Some of his progeny were: STP’s Gr. Ch. John Boy, STP’s Ch. Toro, and Super Gnat’s Boots (who defeated Fuller & Terry’s Ch. Tony in 4:54), out of Green’s Sandy. From a breeding to Chavis’ Maude, John produced Tant’s Gr. Ch. Yellow ROM, Gainey’s Jr. (5X winner), and STP’s Ch. Sassy. Yellow John out produced his illustrious sire, Tramp Red Boy.

Garrett's CH. BRONCO

Garrett's CH. JEEP ROM Finley's CH. BO ROM Loposay’s DUBS

Loposay’s DOT

CH. HONEYBUNCH ROM Walling's BULLYSON

Carver's AMBER

Garrett’s SHARON Garrett's CH. JEEP ROM Finley's CH. BO ROM

CH. HONEYBUNCH ROM

Garrett’s KATE Finley's CH. BO ROM

CH. HONEYBUNCH ROM

Ch. Bronco was the result of Ch. Jeep being bred to his daughter, Sharon, whose dam was Kate, Jeep’s littermate sister. Sharon was also a littermate to William’s Ch. Shorty. Bronco defeated three well-known kennels in the times of :26, :56, and :26 minutes respectfully. His career started at the age of thirteen months and he died at the early age of three, due to heart failure. He was bred only twice, of those two breeding he sired the 6X winner Kingfish Kid’s Ch. Bernie. There were also two littermates to Bernie who was bred together, Stevenson’s Buck and Wench and produced Renegade Kennels’ (Tupper’s) Midnight Renegade, who in turn produced Cat & Company’s Gr. Ch. Jinx.

This brings up the next, volatile subject, of which bloodlines can be inbred and still produce consistently. I think the Tramp Red Boy dogs are the most popular of the inbred lines today. It seems this line of Pit Bulls flourishes off of inbreeding. Some other dogs that do well when inbred are Hammond’s Rufus, Chinaman, Kingfish, Indian Bolio, Nigerino, and Jocko strains just to name a few.

Inbreeding should be used sparingly and needs to be combined with ruthless selection in order to produce competitive match dogs. Undesirables can and should be culled to dispose of the pups that show signs of not conforming to the standards that we, the breeders, have set for ourselves. Something that can not be done with humans of course.

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January 3, 2010 at 3:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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